For Writers With Day Jobs

I don’t usually share newspaper articles here, but this one is special. I don’t know this writer or her book, but I love her real-life story.

This post is dedicated to every writer who holds down a day job (including parenthood which, from what I hear, is at least two full-time jobs in and of itself) and still manages to carve out time for writing, reading, researching agents, figuring out publishing, and doing all the stuff necessary to put our stories out into the world. Continue reading

Two and a Half Careers

juggler

When I was in my twenties and possessed unlimited energy, there was a brief period when I had three jobs. Continue reading

Celebrating, Part 2.5: When Lightning Strikes Twice

lightning strike twice

A couple weeks ago, I shared the big news that my novel placed as a finalist in the Faulkner-Wisdom Creative Writing Competition.

And now, there’s more news, because today, the novella lists were posted, and . . . Continue reading

Celebrating, Part 2

sparkler 2

Back in April, I told you about how I’d finally finished writing my first novel.

After I finished the writing, I began to take the next steps, such as researching agents, learning how to write a query letter, and trying to decide whether I’d be better off with traditional publishing or indie publishing. I also did one other thing: I submitted my manuscript to the William Faulker-William Wisdom Creative Writing Competition for unpublished works. Continue reading

Reading and Writing What You Like, Or How I Accidentally Found My Niche

Anthony Cardno and me 7-15-18

Last weekend, I had the great good fortune to reconnect with someone I hadn’t seen since 1984. Back then, he was a high school student in the drama club I directed. Now, we’re both in our fifties, a notion I still find mildly shocking, but one I need to get used to since I’m bearing down fast on the day when only one of us holds that distinction. Continue reading

The Novella Dilemma

Novella: a work of fiction intermediate in length and complexity between a short story and a novel.

(Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com)

So here’s the situation. You sat down to write a story. You didn’t think about form or length. You just wanted to tell this particular tale. When you finished, you found that it was 20,000 words long. “Gee,” you thought. “That seems kind of long for a short story.” And then you did a little research, and you found that most literary journals want stories of less than around 5,000 words (some less than 3,000).

oops

Continue reading

Celebrating

glasses

On Friday, April 13, 2018, I wrote the word I sometimes doubted I would never write:

END

Continue reading