WTF, Zuck?

Photo credit: Anita S. on Pixabay

The Book of Faces* informed me today that my account is “restricted.”

*Calling it this to avoid tripping any algorithms since I no longer have any idea what is or isn’t permissible on that platform.

The offense (to use the term loosely) which gave rise to this restriction was my response to a commenter who claimed that covid is no big deal and he knows because he just had a couple days of sniffles. Rather than pointing out the 700,000 people who have died from this virus in the past 19 months, I merely responded “So far” and provided a link to an article from the Centers for Disease Control about after-effects of covid a/k/a “long covid” which, according to said article, can surface several months after one has been ill. I didn’t call him an idiot or a fool, nor did I wish anything ill on him. I simply pointed out a resource that disagreed with his blithe view of a deadly virus.

Nonetheless, based on this post, my account has been restricted.

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To Print or Not To Print

Photo credit: Clarissa Bell on Pixabay

Ebooks have been around for a long time. I have friends who read exclusively on their phones, computers, tablets, or dedicated e-reader devices. The driving force behind ebooks seems to be convenience: you can get the book faster, it adds nothing to the weight or bulk of your luggage, you won’t forget to bring it along, you can adjust the print size to your comfort level, and you’ll never lack for something to read when your lunch date is late.

With all these advantages, why does anyone choose a print book?

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For What It’s Worth, or Why I’m Hiring a Cover Designer for My Novella

Photo credit: Tabitha Turner on Unsplash

I am now one step closer to the release of my novella, My Brother, Romeo.

Today, I sent my acceptance of a quote for cover design by the talented folks at Design for Writers. This is the same firm that did the gorgeous cover for my novel, State v. Claus. If you’re an indie author looking for professionals to handle your cover, I highly recommend Design for Writers. (Note: They didn’t ask me to say this, nor are they giving me any kind of deal or perks for recommending them. I’m saying it because I remember how many hours I spent researching cover designers, and I’m hoping to save somebody else a little time.)

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Process Stories

Photo credit: Kazuo Ota on Unsplash

Last night, I discovered a streaming series entitled, “The Movies that Made Us.” In its first season, the series explored the making of “Dirty Dancing,” the iconic coming-of-age story of a young woman who falls in love with a dance instructor during her family’s summer vacation at a Catskills resort.

“Dirty Dancing” was released in 1987. I had just moved to Stamford, Connecticut, when the movie came out, but I didn’t know that the studio responsible for “Dirty Dancing” was also based in Stamford or that this studio was known at the time for adult videos, not feature films. I also didn’t know the driving forces behind the movie were two women, or that at least part of the movie was based on the experiences of one of the women, or that they’d ended up with the now-defunct Stamford studio because literally every other studio had turned it down, many claiming it was “too girly.”

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Guest Post: A Word from Our Managing Editor

The managing editor of Tuxedo Cat Press would like to share a few thoughts.

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Dear Readers,

My name is Charlotte Antoinette Burgh. Once upon a time, I was a pregnant stray. Then, I was a shelter kitty, waiting to be adopted while my adorable little kittens easily found homes.

Today, I am the managing editor of Tuxedo Cat Press.

It wasn’t an easy road. My time on the streets was rocky. In addition to getting knocked up, I got into a few scuffles that left me with a scar on my nose and another on my eye. Not terrible, but enough that some potential adopters didn’t think I was pretty enough.

Screw them. I’m gorgeous.

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Write It Down

Photo credit: StockSnap on Pixabay

Several days ago, a friend and I went to a local farm to pick blueberries. In the field, it occurred to me that this would make a terrific blog post, because there were similarities between blueberry picking and the writing process. I took some photos, and I even asked my friend to take photos of me picking. As I filled my container, I looked for ways I could link writing and blueberry picking. It was going to be brilliant, the kind of post that would inspire writers for years to come.

Photo credit: me
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Revealing ourselves

Photo credit: K8 on Unsplash

In its way, everything we write reveals us. Not because we’re naming names, but because who we are—what we think, believe, and have experienced—comes through in what we choose to create.

Here’s an example. The novella I plan to publish later this year arose out of the juxtaposition of two very different elements. One element was my beloved Bonanza; in fact, the original version of the novella was created as fan fiction. The other element was my long-ago experience directing a high school drama club, where the kids were talented and enthusiastic and I was utterly clueless. Put the pieces together, revise the living daylights out of them, and voilà! It’s a lighthearted tale about siblings and community theater:  My Brother, Romeo, slated for publication this fall.

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Freedom

Photo credit: Junior Moran on Unsplash

Benjamin Franklin famously wrote, “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.” While he was not writing under circumstances even remotely resembling the events I am about to relate, I almost feel as if I understand a little better today the sentiment he expressed more than 265 years ago.

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The Accidental Habit

Photo credit: Dex Ezekiel on Unsplash

So this is weird.

Last night, I was completely ready to be done with this #1000wordsofsummer challenge. This evening, as I watched the news and late-night television for the first time in ages, I wasn’t even thinking of writing.

But then . . . I found myself wanting to write.

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